Mar 042014

This post originally appeared on the Flux7 blog at: It discusses the relationship between throughput and latency summarized by Little’s Law. Little’s Law has applications on any system with throughput and latency, whether it is memory performance or an industrial assembly line. Read the original article below:

Continue reading “Understanding Throughput and Latency Using Little’s Law” »

Dec 132013
Hadoop Logo



At Flux7Labs we have done a detailed comparison of all too Hadoop distributions. We not only compared performance using Intel HiBench benchmarks but also compared more subjective metrics like ease of installation, usability, and ecosystem support. Head over to Flux7 blog to read the whitepaper. As always, feedback is highly appreciated.

Read – A Detailed Comparison of Hadoop Distributions now.


Jun 182013

I made a major career decision two months ago to leave my day job and start Flux7 labs, a consulting and training firm. I made this decision because Flux7 Labs allows me to follow my passion of teaching (providing Big Data/NoSQL trainings) and solving challenges in latest technologies like Hadoop, Cassandra, Twitter Storm, etc. Please visit the LinkedIn profile to learn more.

One of the best parts is that I will have more time and incentive to write blog posts. For those of you who read my post on Linked Lists, I am finally doing a performance benchmark to generate data that proves my points. For those interested in Big Data, I am writing a qualitative and quantitate comparison of different Hadoop distributions out there. Exciting times ahead.


Continue reading “Meet Flux7 Labs (update + shameless marketing)” »

Apr 302013

Sorry for the delay in this post. I could not get to this post in time and wanted to be sure it is well-researched. The final post in this series is a comparison of the hardware support in the ARM and x86 world. As mentioned in the previous post the biggest reason for ARM to include virtualization in their architecture is to be viable in the server market against x86. So I think a comparison of x86 and ARM hardware support for virtualization is warranted.

Continue reading “ARM Virtualization – ARM vs x86 (Part 5)” »

Apr 082013

In the last few posts we discussed the hardware support needed to provide virtualization. In this post how virtualization can empower the user. We’ll discuss the use cases we already see in the server and desktop space, and mobile specific applications like big.LITTLE and lowering production costs for handsets.

Continue reading “ARM Virtualization – Applications (Part 4)” »

Apr 012013

In the second part of the series we introduced memory management and interrupt handling support provided by virtualization hardware extensions. But effective virtualization solutions need to reach beyond the core to communicate with peripheral devices. In this post we discuss the various techniques used for virtualizing I/O, the problems faced, and the hardware solutions to mitigate these problems.

Continue reading “ARM Virtualization – I/O Virtualization (Part 3)” »

Mar 242013

In the first part of this series, I introduced the topic of virtualization. Today I will venture deeper into the ARM virtualization extensions for memory management and handling of interrupts. Within the core, virtualization mostly provides controls over the system registers. But as we move further from the core, and start to communicate with the outside world, difficulties and nuances in the problem start to emerge and the need for hardware support for virtualization becomes apparent.

Continue reading “ARM Virtualization Extensions – Memory and Interrupts (Part 2)” »

Mar 182013

Sorry guys for another hiatus, my job at Calxeda keeps me busy. I was recently discussing ARM’s virtualization support with my friend Ali Hussain (yup, that’s our idea of a fun dinner conversation) and found some very interesting facts. I requested Ali to share his knowledge in a blog post series on this topic, so here you go. Ali is in ARM’s performance modeling team and has been working on ARM cores since 2008.

The idea for this blog post stemmed from talking to people that had the impression that ARM’s virtualization support, even with the virtualization extensions in Cortex-A15, is limited. I plan to write a few posts exploring virtualization, and the support for it in the ARM and x86 ISAs. This post will draw heavily on my understanding of the ARM architecture and operating systems.

Continue reading “ARM Virtualization Extensions — Introduction (Part 1)” »

Jul 162012

Raspberry Pi, Mele A1000, MK802, and … . the market is getting filled with these low price geek toys. I personally see a lot of potential here. These “devicelets” can do to hardware what apps did to software. Some readers may remember that I posted a tutorial to create a simple evaluation board out of a iPhone 3GS last year. Back then, Pandaboard was the only choice to get an ARM computer in the market and it was never available. Now there are so many vendors and sellers that it has become difficult to chose. This post is just a concise summary of all the available choices I have come across so far.

Continue reading “Which little PC should I buy? Raspberry Pi? Mele A1000? or …” »

Jul 132012

After I downloaded  iOS6 on my iPhone last week, the first icon I clicked on was Passbook only to find that Apple had not put any example passes in there. Since Passbook was the primary reason I had downloaded iOS6, I dug into the API and learned how to create a pass myself. It was a great learning experience that I want to share with others. I also provide a shell script to automate the pass generation process and also present to you,, a user-friendly GUI-based service to create passes.

Continue reading “Generating passes for iOS6′s Passbook” »